Four-year-old big 

 
McKinley turns 4 today.  “1. 2. 3. 4,” she excitedly pronounces to the world. My bustling -happy- hyper- curious- passionate -confident- and quite often stubborn -mini me. 

You can tell she’s older.  “Come on Cora, you can do it—No Cora that’s our neighbor’s yard.”  Just by the way she tries to redirect her little sister.  Or, by letting her little sister actually play with her brand spankin’ new baby stroller.  That’s big.  That’s four-year-old big.  

And she’s now in the throws of preschool drama, she said bullshit.  “Mom, today, she said I’m not her friend, she said I can’t play with her, she hit me with a stick, she wouldn’t listen to me…”  The list is endless.  And the she changes.   Trying to navigate a four year through emotional social awareness is D-raining. But, that’s four-year-old big.  

However, I can still get her to snuggle on my chest and watch a show.  And she still needs me when she gets a boo-boo. So, she still my little girl.  Thankfully.  Trying to hold onto as many as these moments, because I know they are temporary.

All my love, to my KinBug today, and every day. Happy Birthday my big four-year-old! Xoxo  

~g 

Morning Conversations 

Sometimes, Monday mornings are rough. You know, rolling out of bed groggy while attempting to re-establish weekday routines. Playing out the idea of hooky on a Monday inside your head.  Wishing to sink back into your pillow. Little things can feel rushed Monday morning. Like, conversations with your three-year-old. (Almost four-year-old).   

Over peanut-buttered-jelly toast and applesauce McKinley discussed her dream to me.  And we didn’t rush.  

“Were you by the pink and blue hydrangeas last night?” McKinley asked. 

I played along, “Oh yes! I was.” 

“And did you see Papa? He was playing with me in my dreams last night!”  (She is referring to my late father who passed away). 

“Oh really?! What were you guys doing?” 

“Papa was pushing us on the swings, but I was younger,” says McKinley very grown up. 

  
Sometimes it stirs these bottomless emotions inside me, but other times it brings comfort knowing he visits her. Still keeping us all safe. Still staying close.  

~g

😘The Kiss Box 😘


Many parents work long hours through the week.  And as much as we don’t want to believe it–it’s just hard on our little critters.  They miss us. Constantly.  At least in our household McKinley misses her father day in and day out.

The book, The Kiss Box by Bonnie Verburg and Henry Cole is a great story that illustrates to children how as parents our love is just as strong even when we’re away.   And nowadays so many parents have to work outside the home.

The story helps initiate conversations about feelings, and in this case feelings of “missing.”   And, it  provides wonderful ways to send each other love, or in the book “kisses,” when being a part from one another.  In the story Mama Bear and Little Bear create “kiss boxes” as a way to send each other kisses when they were a part from each other.

McKinley and I decided we wanted to create our own kiss boxes, as a way to send each other love when we needed it.  This turned out to be a truly meaningful, engaging, and fun project– Naturally, I had to share.


Inside the boxes we put random things.  McKinley cut up fabrics and different textured paper as little sheets to represent love and kisses. I cut tiny hearts out of tissue paper.  When it comes to love the possibilities are endless.

~g

Analytical Reasoning of 3 year olds. 

McKinley asks, “Where does Meme live?” 

“Reynoldburg,” I say. 

“Where is Reynoldsburg?”

“In Columbus.”

“Where is Columbus?”

“Ohio.”

“Where is Ohio?”

“In the United States.”

“Where is the United States?”

“The world.”

“Where is the world?”

“Outter space.”

“So that means I’m in Outter space!  I can’t handle myself in outer space.”

~g

Little Philosophers. 

Three year olds ask the best questions. Those tough-sometimes-you-just-can’t-fully-answer type of questions, don’t they? 

My father called this phase, “The Little Philosophers phase,” because they are curious thoughtful thinkers. And always asking, “why?!”  

  
This morning, after we all finally got buckled into our cozy CRV, McKinley started out, “Why do we need to save the earth? No no no no..Mama. HOW do we save the earth? That’s what I mean.”

“What a great question McKinley.  There are many reasons to save the earth and many ways we can save the earth.  Like, using less water.  Turning off our lights when we’re not using them.  Recycling. The list goes on.” 

I told her to ask all of her friends and teachers, because there was something to  learn from everyone.  So, I said, I would do the same. What are your thoughts on why we should save the earth and/or how we can save the earth?! 

-G